The TFA Conundrum

Well, I had my TFA phone interview on Saturday morning, and I thought it went very well indeed. The interviewer, herself a TFA teacher in New Orleans, seemed friendly, engaged, and very interested in me. I had ready responses with detailed examples to all questions, and the feeling was very much relaxed and conversational.

To be honest, I’m second-guessing TFA quite a bit. On the one hand, there is a lot of great press and commentary out there on the organization. On the other… some fairly virulent criticism. The TeachForUs independent blogging network has provided both types of accounts; on the whole it is a confusing blend of the inspirational and insidious.

As I indicated in an earlier post, I do not harbor much concern for the anti-TFA sentiments that are really directed at individual motives and behaviors of TFA corps members themselves. For example, deciding to stay in teaching as a “service project” for only two years before leaving, or declining to pursue further training and education. These are decisions that anyone entering teaching could make, TFA or not. In fact, from what I read anyway , the retention rate for any teacher in an urban or low-SES school is pretty atrocious, TFA or no. Does TFA encourage a revolving door by only putting a 2-year minimum on recruits? Maybe. But I bet that a lot of people end up staying in teaching that never would have considered it as a career otherwise too. How long I stay in teaching and what my motives are for entering it are up to me, not TFA, so I find that criticism personally irrelevant.

What *is* concerning for me, however, is that I might end up being associated with an organization that is tied to much less substantiated, but far more worrisome, tactics. Gary Rubenstein, the (in)famous ex-TFA TFA critic, has written extensively on his blog about such tactics, and lately posted his most scathing yet . For example, expanding into districts that are laying off teachers? If TFA purports to send teachers with only five weeks of training into schools, they had better be filling slots that could not otherwise be filled by any qualified candidate. Are districts, under ever-tighter budgetary and political pressure, laying off experienced, unionized teachers in favor of politically backed, inexperienced, cheap fresh-outs? For the specific case of STEM subjects, I really doubt this is the case, so perhaps this doesn’t really apply to me either. But again, do I want to be associated with an organization that might/would do that?

Another big picture concern: the “Education Reform” movement. I am vehemently opposed to privitization of the public school system, just as vehemently as I have been opposed to the contracting out of RDT&E (Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation) at NASA. Without tangenting too far into all the ways that private money has our federal and state governments by the cojones, I will simply say that TFA appears to be firmly on the side of those who would use wildly inaccurate quantitative metrics to force in private charter control (or vouchers or what have you) of a public system, shortchanging students and laying off those damn lazy unionized teachers along the way. Not sure I like that either… While I’ve definitely had some lazy and/or ineffective teachers, blaming an already strained profession for systemic racial and socio-economic divides is scapegoating at best, and harmful at a long-term genocidal level at worst .

I guess what it comes down to is the basic question: Is it ok to use a possibly less-than-ethical organization as a means to an end of doing greater good individually? Or does any association with an ethically questionable (not conclusively bad, just questionable) organization negate/taint any good that may come of it?

These questions and others led me to diversify my options. I am proceeding with the TFA application – I should hear in a week if I advanced to the final day-long interview session that takes place at the end of the month. I will be notified of the final admissions decision and placement school/subject on January 17th.

However, in addition, I am also applying to the early admissions track for the Boston Teacher Residency . BTR places admitted members into a year-long, intensive Masters program at UMass Boston, combining urban teacher preparation with four days a week of student teaching. Upon completion of the Masters, residents are placed in the Boston Public Schools, and receive a full waiver of the tuition of their training upon completion of three years of service.  BTR is also clearly committed to community development and long-term teacher retention for what seems like truely transformative change. Making the November 15th deadline means a possible Selection Day interview invite in mid December, an interview in early January, and a final notification of acceptance on January 20th.

I guess I’ll have to figure this out by then. I have a feeling though, that like other significant forks in the road in my past, one path is just going to seem intuitively right, and I’m going to just take it and be too busy kicking ass at whatever challenges lie around the corner to ever look back. I just don’t know which it will be yet.




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